In Remembrance of Pat Tillman

Pat Tillman was a hard-hitting safety for the Arizona Cardinals. He fought his way into the league after getting selected with the 226th overall pick in the 1998 NFL Draft. But that’s how Pat lived; he was a fighter. Pat Tillman lived life going through adversity with passion and hard work. He dedicated himself to everything he put his mind to. In 2002, he turned down a 3.6 million dollar contract to go fight for his country. America had just suffered from the 9/11 attacks and Pat felt he had a responsibility to serve and protect his country.

Tillman has had many relatives who have fought for this country, such as his great grandfather, who was at Pearl Harbor. He respected and admired those who put their life on the line for this country and felt he needed to do the same. He saw the American flag as a symbol of the freedom this country provides and how good we truly have it. Tillman said that even with strong feelings for the flag, he didn’t always think about and realize how much freedom we have and how great life is. Pat died trying to keep this freedom alive for us. On April 22, 2004, Pat Tillman was killed in Afghanistan due to friendly fire. He died fighting for this country and trying to continue that freedom for others. 

Pat inspired us by playing football, but he inspired us more with what he did after. He refused a life where he could play the game he loved for millions; instead, he chose the life of a soldier, where there is no recognition, no millions. It’s a terrifying job where you don’t know if you are going to make it home, but Pat felt that he had an obligation to serve this country.

In remembrance of Pat Tillman and all the soldiers who have fought and died for this country, just take a second and think. Think of what they fought for. Think of the freedom you have. Think of the life they gave you. Pat lived life as a hardworking, passionate, loving person who dedicated himself to his goals. Why not live like that too?

Advertisements

One Reply to “In Remembrance of Pat Tillman”

Comments are closed.